Archives For Write

*Note: The following was written four years ago but for some reason I never posted it… most of this is probably said and done already but… after a little polish… here it is now.*

INTRODUCTION:

This reflection is on: THE DARK KNIGHT RISES and, by extension, the Dark Knight trilogy.

This post started with one idea and it kept leading to another. Call this post, an unloading of instantaneous thoughts. Obviously there are spoilers so… yeah, you know the drill.

 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

You don’t have to worry about a thing
Just come on up, come on up
Just come on up, baby
And have a good time.

– The Rascals

 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

After seeing the film once, it feels like the perfect way to end the series. It restates the major themes and ends the journey of Bruce Wayne.

My interest of writing this post comes from this overwhelming joy of watching the film and the fact that the character is one I have grown up on since I was a kid. The focus isn’t to review the film but to try to provide some commentary on the deeper ideas that the series presented.

My focus: Batman’s journey, how would one finish this the Batman story, influences, story techniques we’ve seen before, and quasi-philosophical musings. I find the personal journey and struggles more resonating so you will see a void of socio-political musing. Perhaps another day.

Make sure you have some eye-drops handy.

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Return of the Jim

April 26, 2016 — Leave a comment
Processed with VSCO with acg preset

“Two of Us” 

 

Long time ago, I walked away from a dream.

It’s still there. Hanging out on the streets of Toronto. Only getting up to wander at the early hours of the morning. Talking about how we’re going to do this and how we’re going to do that.

While that is happening, I’m waaaaay over here… across two continents and a sprawl countries and an ocean… deep in the urban jungle of a bipolar city… taking on the tropical heat and the torrent of flooding streets… I’m doing what people say I’m doing, I’m simply living.

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A new year. A new month. A new plan to tackle impossible goals.

Don’t worry, this isn’t an unloading post. I’m sure you’ve read enough of those already. We get it, right? We all want to be better versions of ourselves. I say, don’t think too far ahead. Keep it real. KEEP IT DAILY. Think of… the Pippi Longstocking theme song: WHAT SHALL I DO TODAY? You know, having a question like that could be a great daily mantra of living.

And while you’re at it, acknowledge the failures of last year and see what went wrong. It’s a continuous learning experience and mistakes makes us stronger.

But now for the tips. Continue Reading…

The Two Antagonists

August 20, 2013 — Leave a comment

“Education consists mainly of what we have unlearned.” — Mark Twain

Here’s something I picked up when I was listening to a few interviews about a screenwriting book called, Dan O’Bannon’s Guide to Screenplay Structure. Okay, okay… so I technically didn’t read the book but I was curious enough to look into it. And guess what? The curiosity paid off when co-writer, Matt Lohr, dropped a few teases from the book.

Please note I’m not truly regurgitating the information here. Most of this, is me filling in the blanks. If what is in the actual book different from what is said here, it’s just me misinterpreting the clues.

If you’re also a novice screenwriter, this might be a good purchase. The book supposedly has an overview of the other screenwriting gurus before stepping into Dan O’Bannon’s way. And if you don’t know who Dan O’Bannon is and why you should consider his opinions, here’s a sampler of his output: Alien, The Return of the Living Dead, Total Recall, Dark Star, Screamers, Lifeforce and some other B-horror goodies.

So let’s jump to it.

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I am alone. I am sitting in the same chair that I’ve been using for over fifteen years. I search my feelings and the memories flood in. Usually they are filled with some form of resentment.

I read in a book that ‘manic-depression may trigger the desire to communicate, make perceptions more vivid, and loosen associations in a way that makes written creativity more likely.’

Do we seek this place so that creativity could flourish or does the stress of creative work simply drives us over the edge? Is the creative life only pleasing because the way we are… prevents us from holding stable jobs?

I’m thinking of people… people I once recalled as friends.

They are nothing but memories for a story I have yet to write or finish writing. My sister told me that every face you have seen in a dream are based on the faces you have seen in life. Even the ones you only saw for a split second. The strangers you see in the store. The coffee shop. On the bus. Every possibility of human connection that you pass by on your way through the day.

On average, you only participate with the same seven people on a daily or weekly basis. When someone else comes in — be it a new friend or a prospective lover — they will replace someone from the original members. We move in and out of circles just like that. Everything is in constant flux.

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Last week I finished Ernest Hemingway’s A Movable Feast — a memoir of his time in 1920s Paris. It’s a short book and it has some neat insights about what he did and the people he hung out with — but you see it through his particular point of view (especially how F. Scott Fitzgerald is portrayed — I can’t tell if it’s truthful but it’s pretty damn hilarious). But for me (and whoever else read the book), the takeaway passage happens roughly near the beginning:

“I always worked until I had something done and I always stopped when I knew what was going to happen next. That way I could be sure of going on the next day.

But sometimes when I was starting a new story and I could not get it going, I would sit in front of the fire and squeeze the peel of the little oranges into the edge of the flame and watch the sputter of blue that they made. I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, ‘Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.’ So finally I would write one true sentence, and then go on from there.

It was easy then because there was always one true sentence that I knew or had seen or had heard someone say. If I started to write elaborately, or like someone introducing or presenting something, I found that I could cut that scrollwork or ornament out and throw it away and start with the first true simple declarative sentence I had written.”

This guy.

Simple, huh? It’s a neat little writing mantra to decorate your typewriter with or to add to your wall of “inspiring” quotes… that is, if you do that kind of thing, heh heh heh ;)

the front porch theory

February 15, 2013 — Leave a comment

There is a romantic image when we think of the ideal institution (for my case, film school). We think of the teaching staff, the courses, the lifestyle, and the opportunities to improve our craft. Even when reality kicks in and the ugly parts bleed through, we can still make the best of a situation. It’s only a matter of asking yourself: Is the glass half empty or half full?

The perfect mixture is when you have the right amount of passion for the subject at hand — for yourself and your fellow colleagues. It’s only when these two things are met that we have those wonderful conversations and discussions that spice everything up.

Of the people I’ve talked to, we all agreed that it was this thing — the moments outside of the class — that helped made the program valuable. This is what Front Porch theory is — a term borrowed from Francis Ford Coppola:

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